The Daily Colonist, September 15, 1914

#dailycolonist1914 - News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

  • Germans in retreat on all fronts, western, Russian and Chinese.
  • Use of the pejorative "Hun" for the first time that I've noticed.
  • Dramatic and interesting article on the Germans capturing and cutting off the cable relay station on Fanning Island in the mid-Pacific, cutting direct communication between Canada and New Zealand & Australia. [Fanning Island was an uninhabited coral atoll used by the British for a relay station for an underwater cable between Bamfield (here written as "Banfield", which was the original name, but everyone on the island always said and spelled it wrong so at some point someone gave up and changed the spelling officially) and Fiji, and on to Australia and New Zealand. Part of the British "All Red Line" (illustration attached after the ads) which was a global cable network connecting all points in the Empire via British-controlled areas only, which were traditionally represented in red on maps, thus the nickname. The system had multiple redundancies and even with Fanning Island cut off, note that the article specifies that "business from Great Britain and elsewhere is being dispatched by the Eastern route."]
  • 1916 Olympic Games, set to be in Berlin, very likely to be canceled. [They were of course, with Berlin not getting the Games until 1936 where the Nazi propagandists introduced the torch relay to emphasize their Aryan agenda as the rightful torch-bearers of Western Civilisation.]
  • A selection of ads that caught my eye.

http://www.britishcolonist.ca/dateList.php?year=1914

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Source: http://www.mbarrick.com/blog/140915/daily-colonist-september-15-1914

#dailycolonist1914 - This is too good not to give its own post. In the summary of the fighting in Galicia (a province of the Austrio-Hungarian Empire) the paper makes an aside to characterize the Galician people, saying that anyone who has...

...lived in the prairies know the Galicians, who during the past 10 years have come in the thousands to help the farmers. The women, as well the men work in the fields, and many of the girls are very pretty. The men are quarrelsome and are but too apt to use knives or other weapons. They are however, industrious and quick to learn. Their native land is now being laid waste by the trampling feet of Russian and Austrian armies.

All four of my paternal great-grandparents were ethnic Ukrainians from Galicia, so I absolutely had to share it in a post of its own. "Barrick", of course, is an English name and there is a long story as to why my father chose to anglicise his name, this sort of racism being no small part of that. Back in 191 simply having white skin did not make you "white". "White" only applied to natives of the United Kingdom, and even at that being Scottish, Welsh or Irish was second to being English, with Catholic Irish being less than Protestant Irish. "The wogs being at Calais" was the saying, Calais being a French city across the English Channel from Dover. If you don't know what a "wog" is, well, that's probably a good thing.\240

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Source: http://www.mbarrick.com/blog/140913/addendum-daily-colonist-september-13-1914

The Daily Colonist, September 13, 1914

#dailycolonist1914 - News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

The war reporting is frustratingly vague again: an advance here, a retreat there, nothing substantial and all of it happening on an abstract, unimaginable scale. German news reporting is lampooned as ridiculous propaganda and the Germans are made out to be callous villains while the Austrians are cowards.

  • Details of an aerial battle over Troyes, France.\240
  • Canadian troops now overseas are about to be sent into the front, waiting for transport.
  • New Jovian moon discovered, 9th so far [Officially this moon will be designated Jupiter iX until 1955, when it is unofficially named "Hades". In 1975 it will be officially named "Sinope" by the IAU. 13 moons were discoved before the arrival of Voyager I, which discoved three more. Better telescopes and techniques like the ones used to identify exoplanets have now raised the total count of Jovian moons to 67.]
  • Whaling ships return for the winter after a successful season.
  • 2-page map of Europe printed. Also avaiable for sale for 35¢ (or mailed anywhere in Canada, Great Britiain or the United Stated for 50¢).
  • The children's section once again has a nice summary of the week's events [again written at a level that would be considered "college level" today, and featuring an interesting tangent on "civilizing Africa" that speaks volumes of the racism inherent in colonialism.]
  • And lastly, a collection advertisments that caught my eye for being beautiful or interesting, including a "celebrity endorsemnt" of Brovril by polar explorer Ernest Shackelton [At the time polar explorers had the same sort of cachet as Astronauts did in the 1960s, eg. remember Christopher Robin's "expotition to the north pole" in Winne the Pooh.]

http://www.britishcolonist.ca/dateList.php?year=1914

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Source: http://www.mbarrick.com/blog/140913/daily-colonist-september-13-1914

The Daily Colonist, September 12, 1914

#dailycolonist1914 - News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

Once again the news from the Western and Russian fronts is sweeping in scope, vague, and doesn't really say anything.\240

  • House of Commons in London again debates loosening censorship to counter disinformation being spread in neutral countries, especially in the United States, "in view of the fact that strenuous and very extensive efforts were being made to poison public opinion there."
  • A sentry on duty in Calgary is shot at with no suspects being caught. [This is suspicious in itself, and may be manufactured to justify the internments to come. I'll be keeping an eye out for similar stories.]
  • [Meanwhile, on "the moon"] Portuguese troops sent to Africa to defend their colonies. [Yesterday's fighting near Lake Nyassa (Malawi) is adjactent to Mozambique, a Portuguese colony.]
  • Further on the censorship front, an example of the form-letter post-cards issued to British imperial troops.
  • The Cowichan fall fair is on in Duncan and expected to have a big turn out.\240
  • A few beautifully illustrated ads.

http://www.britishcolonist.ca/dateList.php?year=1914

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Source: http://www.mbarrick.com/blog/140912/daily-colonist-september-12-1914

The Daily Colonist, September 11, 1914

#dailycolonist1914 - News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

More of the same in Europe. A Belgian town recovered, German losses and advances in France, Russian advances, it is hard to keep track of what's going on.\240

  • Meanwhile, in Africa, there is fighting between the English and Germans in Cameroon and near Lake Nyassa [Malawi]. While not mentioned in the article, German East Africa [Tanzania] is the last obstacle to the British imperial dream of consolidating territory to have a completely British-controlled railway from Cape Town to Cairo. [Also bear in mind that in 1914 to most Europeans, Central Africa may as well have been the moon or Mars. "Tarzan", written in 1912, was a science-fiction book. So while a few hundred thousand men fighting in Europe is one thing, a few dozen men fighting on the moon, as it were, is another.]
  • The world "attrition" appears for the first time that I've noticed in an article talking about Imperial Britain's wealth of willing colonial cannon-fodder [not the way they put it, of course.]
  • Saskatchewan brings a knife to the gun-fight, and offers a gift to the Imperial Government of 1,500 horses.
  • An editorial goes on at length about the scale of the war, that the "minor" battles of the war in Europe are on a scale "that would have been called great battles fifty years ago."\240
  • Germans and Austro-Hungarians are ordered to register in Victoria.\240
  • The White Star Line H.M.S. Oceanic, which was the largest liner in the world from its launch in 1899 until it was superceded by the White Star Line H.M.S. Celtic in 1901, which was put into naval service at the outbreak of the war, has run aground off the north coast of Scotland and wrecked. There was no loss of life.\240

http://www.britishcolonist.ca/dateList.php?year=1914

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Source: http://www.mbarrick.com/blog/140911/daily-colonist-september-11-1914

The Daily Colonist, September 10, 1914

#dailycolonist1914 - News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

News from the front is pretty sparse today. Fighting on the Western Front is spread over a large area with no notable developments. What's remarkable about today's paper requires taking the blinders off and reading with 21st century hindsight. Colonialism, nationalism and racism are assumed truths in 1914. Sometimes it is just a vague, permeating force, and sometimes it is so blatant and bizarrely casual that it is stunning that anyone ever thought this way (but then it only takes reading a few YouTube comments to realize maybe not so much has changed.)

  • Russians are advancing into Galicia [a Hungarian province in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, now split between Hungary and Ukraine, and where my paternal ancestors hail from]
  • Germans and Austrians are registering in Canada, swearing to live peacefully and not provide any intelligence to the enemy [this is the first inkling\240of what's now known and the Ukrainian Internment.]
  • Front page news about "India Offering Generous Help". Rulers of the nearly 700 states have all offered support to the British Empire.
  • On the very next page, a report on how East Indian immigration is going to be controlled and curtailed to avoid another Komagata Maru incident. [It is really more that Indian emigration is going to be controlled at the source, allowing only a limited number of passports to be issued each year in order to prevent immigration not only to Canada, but also to Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and anywhere else in the Empire.]
  • The editorial section chimes in on this restriction, stating "It is very satisfactory" and "If they increased indefinitely\240they would destroy the very conditions that made it worth their while coming here. It goes without saying that to overrun Canada with them would make conditions intolerable for Canadians."
  • Meanwhile, on the shipping page the "Annual Exodus of Orientals to China" for Chinese New Year has begun. "Hitherto the C.P.R. has been in the habit of getting the bulk of the particular class of trade as the Chinaman invariably favors the larger boats. Now that the big C.P.R. liners have been temporarily withdrawn from service...the wily Oriental must perforce travel by other lines."
  • On a lighter [but no less bizarre in hindsight] note, the property owners of Davie\240Street have voted against\240having the street paved.
  • [Also strange from a contemporary perspective] Thanksgiving Day 1914 is to be celebrated on Thursday, October 8, rather than on the Monday [The current settled date of the second Monday in October was not set until 1957 and before that it was moved quite a bit.]\240
  • And a couple lovely advertising illustrations.

http://www.britishcolonist.ca/dateList.php?year=1914

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Source: http://www.mbarrick.com/blog/140910/daily-colonist-september-10-1914

The Daily Colonist, September 9, 1914

#dailycolonist1914 - News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

There is a lot of the "usual" vague stories of troop movements and lists of casualties, lacking in detail because of censorship. The propaganda aimed to incense Americans seems to be over for now, although there is one, one paragraph story stating nothing more than the Kaiser has sent a letter to President Wilson without any mention of what might be in the letter.\240

  • Chancellor Lloyd George calls the war a "silver war" and says that it will not be over quickly and come down to who has more resources (i.e. money and men) [This flies in the face of the modern "over by Christmas" narrative associated with the beginning of the war.]
  • The Vancouver Board of Trade calls for improved coastal defences. [I think this will result in the still-extant, but abandoned, bunkers in Stanley Park that held 4" guns during WWI. In WWII they were converted to search-light positions, complimenting the Wreck Beach towers.]
  • Some things don't change. There are ads for rain wear on nearly every page.
  • The story of the Duchess of Vendome, sister of the King of Belgium, on the women's page. Apparently the old French royal family is not allowed to participate in the military... I didn't know that.
  • On a lighter note: and ad for Black Cat Cigarettes, "Still 10 for 10¢"

http://www.britishcolonist.ca/dateList.php?year=1914

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Source: http://www.mbarrick.com/blog/140909/daily-colonist-september-9-1914

Opening and installation shots from "Rodney Graham: Torqued Chandelier Release and Other Works"

[Object removed. See origninal post to view.] [Object removed. See origninal post to view.]
Source: http://www.mbarrick.com/blog/140908/opening-and-installation-shots-rodney-graham

The Daily Colonist, September 8, 1914

#dailycolonist1914 - News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

September 7 was Labour Day Monday in 1914 and there was no paper, and there will be no more Monday extra edition since it was clear toward the end of August that there just wasn't enough fresh news coming from the front to fill even one sheet of newsprint. Today's paper is rather sparse with news from the war, and it is not clear whether it is censorship or a genuine lack of new developments that makes it that way. While it is impossible to do this without some "advance" knowledge and a\24021st-century\240criticality of the naïve\240propaganda, nationalism and racism, but I keep that commentary parenthetical, I do try to look at these 100 year old papers from the perspective of someone living here and this being their only access to news.

  • Germans are approaching Paris. A map of Paris is printed on the front page.
  • Funding for the Canadian Northern Railway is secured, despite fears that funds might be withheld because of the war
  • Germans sink a British ship, killing 242 men.
  • A British submarine sinks ships in Bremerhaven Harbour
  • The Komagata Maru\240arrives in Yokohama after being refused landing in Vancouver in July on an immigration technicality [designed specifically to hamper immigration from Asia]. The spokesman for the would-be Indian immigrants [some of whom starved while waiting in Vancouver] says, "I thought that my fellowmen would be allowed to enter any part of the British domain as British subjects and I think racial prejudice somewhat influenced the court on its decision in the case."

http://www.britishcolonist.ca/dateList.php?year=1914

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Source: http://www.mbarrick.com/blog/140908/daily-colonist-september-8-1914

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